What’s it like?

White and bright as John, Lenhon’s piano room, this Georgian bolthole, tucked away in the tiny south Devon village of Chillington, is tricky to find -.but therein lies its Gharm. It’s a stylish hideaway for A-listers oh the run and lovers looking for a naughty break. The decor is a triumph of crisp modernity, with brushstrokes of quirky vintage glam, an underlay of cosy comfort and friendly service thrown in. Beds are big, beautiful, hand-carved – and ripe for romping in. Lose yourself in the one in Room 5, bathe in the low-slung bath or sashay your way: down the catwalk shower (it’s three metres long), Emerge for afternoon tea (free), while house kitten Percy plays by the log fire. Feeling comfy? Course you are.

And the food?

‘Devonshire doorstep fresh’ is chef Ally’s motto, which means local, seasonal produce served with verve. Try the ‘Smokey platter’ of Gressingham duck breast, Manuka smoked trout and smoked salmon, or the lobster Caesar salad. Eat anywhere you choose, or with elegant locals in the restaurant, admiring the garden views.

Day trips nearby?

A half-hour amble down Devon lanes will take you to the beaehi Better still, book: a chauffeur-driven local tour vyith Tony-(01548: 858877; from £140 per car carrying six): try chi-chi Salcombe, Art Deco Burgh island via the causeway, or wine tastings in Devonshire vineyards.

How much?

Doubles from £180, B&B (01548 580505, www.whitehousedevon.com).

What’s it like?

The nature-themed sculptures dotting this place – spot the figure made out of bark in the restaurant – are the only clue to The Scarlet’s eco-credentials. First and foremost, it’s a decadent retreat, opened last summer, near Newquay. Seaside panoramas beam in through huge windows, while the spa specialises in heavenly Ayurvedic massages. But unlike many so-called ‘eco’ hotels, this one is the real deal: the chlorine-free outdoor pool is cleansed by reeds; the roof has been planted with sea thrift flowers (for insulation and to attract wildlife); and the under-floor heating – sourced from a biomass boiler – is powered by waste wood chippings. The best aspect has to be the sunset view from the two wood-fired hot tubs overlooking the beach.

And the food?

With its curved wooden booths and ruby-red cushions, you’ll feel at home in the restaurant whether you’re wearing slippers or sequins. Grilled plaice with onion and orange confiture might be followed by warm prune cake with bergamot cream. The hotel doesn’t allow children under 16, so you’ll get to eat in peace. Day trips nearby? Sheltered Mawgan Porth Bay is a short totter down the hill. It’s a fine surfing beach and doesn’t suffer anywhere near the crowds of nearby Watergate Bay. The Scarlet shares a surf school with its sister hotel, The Bedruthan Steps, up the hiil (private two-hour lessons from £65; board and wetsuit hire costs £13 for a half day).

How much?

Doubles from £180, B&B (01637 861800, www. scarlethotel.co.uk).

What’s it like?

The painstaking refurbishment of this 1790s farmhouse in rural Laugharne started in 2006, and wasn’t fully complete until last summer. But as they say, good things come to those who wait. The mezzanine suites in the old barn have been kitted out with spiral staircases, red pony-skin armchairs and free-standing tubs. There’s a little spa and a pool, while design features such as 300-year-old milk wheels propped up in the courtyard remind you of the farmhouse’s former life. There are exotic touches elsewhere, such as the giant Moroccan wooden door that leads into the restaurant, where perfect poached eggs are served to couples in linen shirts and Sunday morning chinos.

And the food?

The glass-fronted restaurant looks out over dry-stone walls and butterflies flitting between beetroots and shallots in the vegetable garden; the chef (pinched from Le Manoir Aux Quat’ Saisons) serves roast Welsh lamb with confit potatoes, and mandarin creme briilee. Day trips nearby? Laugharne is Dylan Thomas country. Venture down the steep stone steps to the Boathouse (01994 427420, www.dylanthomasboathouse. com; £3.75), where he wrote Under Milk Wood. There’s a little wooden canoe in the parlour that he brought back from America for his son, and a stirring view from his writing shed – across the Taf Estuary to the Gower Peninsula. The tearoom serves great homemade bam brith (fruit loaf).

How much?

Doubles from £265, B&B (01994 427417, www.hurst-house.co.uk).

What’s it like?

After a long slog through sluggish Friday-night traffic, the goodies – plates of cheese, homemade raspberry muffins and miniature bottles of champagne – in the rooms at Randy Pike are as welcoming as a hug and a foot rub. Last year, owners Chrissy and Andy converted part of their home – a 19th-century hunting lodge – into two giant suites. Each has quirkily beautiful interiors: carp-print wallpaper, flea-market-style furniture, fresh flowers and giant bathrooms. You’ll wake to views stretching to Windermere as the resident Jemima Puddle-Ducks quack outside, before breakfasting on compote trifles followed by scrambled eggs and fresh bread.

And the food?

The room price includes a ride to and from the couple’s restaurant, The Jumble Room, in nearby Grasmere. Here, things get more eccentric still -loos covered with Blondie record covers, cow and rabbit paintings on the pink walls – but thankfully, the food is no-nonsense. Chrissy is a baker’s daughter, so naturally everything is homemade – try the steak with beetroot salad and the sticky-toffee pud (01539 435188, www.thejumbleroom.co.uk). Day trips nearby? See Wordsworth’s graffiti’d desk at his old school in Hawkshead, a five-minute drive away. Opened in 1585, it has a fascinating history. Make sure a guide is on hand for tales about the former students’ alcohol intake – during lunchtime (01539 436735, www. hawksheadgrammar.org.uk; free).

How much?

Doubles from £180, B&B (01539 436088, www. randypike.co.uk).

The place:

It’s hard to beat the feeling of waking up in the morning surrounded by the vines of the Cote des Blancs. And at Champagne Eric Isselee’s B&B, Les Grappes d’Or, you get a particularly good sweep of it -patchworks of green trestles, interrupted only by the pale, serpentine tracks of narrow roads. The sunny lounge, which connects the three double bedrooms, is the place to take in the panorama over a glass of fizz. The decor is cosy (peach-coloured floor tiles, textured walls, rustic furniture) and the welcome, from Eric and Carole Isselee and their two bubbly children, is wholly personal.

The tasting:

Inside the family home, learn Champenois tasting techniques. No sniffing, slurping and spitting here – champagne’s flavours are best released when you breathe in through your mouth straight after swallowing. So, with six types of bubbly on offer, the onsite B&B is a wise choice. You’ll find the Isselee’s bottles excellent value: the Cuvee Tradition (£15), made from the oldest vines, has a golden aura; the Rose (a mix of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir grapes; £13) has a distinct berry edge; and the Brut Blanc de Blancs (£12) tingles with fruity flavour.

The lowdown:

Champagne Eric Isselee is eight kilometres south of Epernay on the D10 (350 Rue des Grappes d’Or, Cramant 51530; 00 33 326 575496, www. champagne-eric-isselee.com). Tastings are free, but call ahead to arrange a visit to the cellars. Doubles at Les Grappes d’Or cost from £40, B&B.